Literary Terms Quiz for Romeo and Juliet Act 3, Scene 2

Romeo and Juliet Literary Terms Quiz #4: Juliet Longs for Romeo

Picture This passage from Romeo and Juliet contains highlighted sections. For each highlighted section, identify the literary term being exemplified. Click on each example for the answer and explanation.

Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus’ lodging
: such a wagoner
As Phaethon would whip you to the west,
And bring in cloudy night immediately.
Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night,
That runaway’s eyes may wink and Romeo
Leap to these arms, untalk’d of and unseen.
Lovers can see to do their amorous rites
By their own beauties; or, if love be blind,
It best agrees with night. Come, civil night,
Thou sober-suited matron, all in black,
And learn me how to lose a winning match,
Play’d for a pair of stainless maidenhoods:
Hood my unmann’d blood, bating in my cheeks,
With thy black mantle; till strange love, grown bold,
Think true love acted simple modesty.
Come, night; come, Romeo; come, thou day in night;
For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night
Whiter than new snow on a raven’s back.
Come, gentle night, come, loving, black-brow’d night,
Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night
And pay no worship to the garish sun.

O, I have bought the mansion of a love,
But not possess’d it, and, though I am sold,
Not yet enjoy’d:
so tedious is this day
As is the night before some festival
To an impatient child that hath new robes
And may not wear them.
O, here comes my nurse,
And she brings news; and every tongue that speaks
But Romeo’s name speaks heavenly eloquence.

Romeo and Juliet Quizzes

Test your knowledge of literary terms and Romeo and Juliet with these quizzes.

Romeo and Juliet Sources for Students

Check out these great Romeo and Juliet resources for students or teachers

  • Romeo and Juliet Study Guide. This study guide includes a short summary of the play, a scene by scene summary, important quotes from the play, characters from the play with analysis, and Romeo and Juliet themes.
  • Tips for Analyzing Shakespeare. These suggestions can help you understand Shakespeare better, whether you’re teaching it or reading it.
  • Romeo and Juliet Lesson Plans. These creative lesson plans include a writing assignment, a debate, an interview and even some interactive banishing. After you click on the link, scroll to the bottom for the full array of Romeo and Juliet lesson plans.

ELA Common Core Standards Covered

Successful completion of this quiz satisfies the following ELA Common Core Standards.

L.9-10.5  Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
L.9-10.5a  Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
L.9-10.5b  Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
RL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
L.9-10.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
L.9-10.4 Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

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