Literary Terms Quiz for Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 3

Romeo and Juliet Literary Terms Quiz #3: The Friar Rambles on about Weeds

Picture Photo: Jennifer M Koskinen

This passage from Romeo and Juliet contains highlighted sections. For each highlighted section, identify the literary term being exemplified. Click on each example for the answer and explanation.

The grey-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,
Chequering the eastern clouds with streaks of light,
And flecked darkness like a drunkard reels
From forth day’s path and Titan’s fiery wheels:
Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye,
The day to cheer and night’s dank dew to dry,
I must up-fill this osier cage of ours
With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.
The earth that’s nature’s mother is her tomb;
What is her burying grave that is her womb,
And from her womb children of divers kind
We sucking on her natural bosom find,
Many for many virtues excellent,
None but for some and yet all different.
O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies
In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities:
For nought so vile that on the earth doth live
But to the earth some special good doth give,
Nor aught so good but strain’d from that fair use
Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse:
Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied;
And vice sometimes by action dignified.
Within the infant rind of this small flower
Poison hath residence and medicine power:

For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part;
Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart.
Two such opposed kings encamp them still
In man as well as herbs, grace and rude will;

And where the worser is predominant,
Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.

Romeo and Juliet Quizzes

Test your knowledge of literary terms and Romeo and Juliet with these quizzes.

Romeo and Juliet Sources for Students

Check out these great Romeo and Juliet resources for students or teachers

  • Romeo and Juliet Study Guide. This study guide includes a short summary of the play, a scene by scene summary, important quotes from the play, characters from the play with analysis, and Romeo and Juliet themes.
  • Tips for Analyzing Shakespeare. These suggestions can help you understand Shakespeare better, whether you’re teaching it or reading it.
  • Romeo and Juliet Lesson Plans. These creative lesson plans include a writing assignment, a debate, an interview and even some interactive banishing. After you click on the link, scroll to the bottom for the full array of Romeo and Juliet lesson plans.

ELA Common Core Standards Covered

Successful completion of this quiz satisfies the following ELA Common Core Standards.

L.9-10.5  Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
L.9-10.5a  Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text.
L.9-10.5b  Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
RL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
L.9-10.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
L.9-10.4 Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

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